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April 4, 2014 / Pastor George Fike

Flash Flood – A Quick Guide to The Good and Bad in Aronovsky’s Noah


noahapBy now, you’ve either seen or boycotted Noah the movie.  You’ve no doubt heard everything, good or bad, on the subject.  But just in case, I thought I’d throw in a few parting shots.

First of all, what does the Bible even tell us about Noah?  Here’s an idea: read it HERE.

Noah Bad! – One biblical scholar not only suggests Noah is not biblical, but goes as far as to say it promotes the religion of Kabbalah (a la Madonna) and gnosticism.  This based on research.  He also suggests Christian leaders who have not picked up on it are heretics and should renounce their ordination.  You can read it HERE.  As you read through this I want to remind you: as a youth pastor, I once rigged my turntable to play in reverse so I could prove Stairway to Heaven had Satanic messages in it.  Just sayin’.

Noah Good! (mostly) – Andrew Heard said some of the things I posted last time, and actually said some things I would have said here.  Not wanting to reinvent the wheel, read his blog HERE.

A few things were disappointing to me, but still did not dampen my enthusiasm for the movie:

  • The magic rocks they used to light fires. For Pete’s sake, WHY?  There were a few elements that made me feel like we were watching reruns of Charmed.  Some have pointed out its sources in Jewish mysticism.  No doubt.  But I think the producers simply needed a little bit of modern CGI to be marketable.
  • One of the scenes I most anticipated when I saw the trailer ultimately let me down:   I was expecting a rumble of thunder and a startled crowd. Instead the rocks behind him suddenly stood up like his personal SWAT team of rock creatures.  Some manifestation of the power and presence of God would have been a nice touch, without resorting to a “Hollywooden” Deus ex machina appearance of the “Transformers.”  A dvine intervention perhaps like this.  Our expectations can certainly set us up for disillusionment.   This may account for the many believers who have expressed disappointment in the movie: it wasn’t what they had in mind.

From the Horse’s Mouth: A lot of people have made a big deal about Aronovsky’s avowed atheism.  Whereas, he has called himself and “irreligious Jew,” agnosticism would be closer to the mark than outright atheism.  But why not read what he actually said in an interview with Christianity Today  HERE?

Reviews in social media continue to be mixed and mired in controversy.  No less an authority than my beloved cousin posted:

I just saved $22….by NOT seeing the movie “Noah.” (I already know the real account, and don’t need an atheist to pollute it for me). I’d rather give that $$ to my missionary friend…

On the other hand, one of my good friends and former roommate, a pastor and Bible college professor posted:

As for those of you all unravelled by the Noah flick–“I went to church on Sunday to hear a sermon, and then on Friday I went to the theater to see a movie.” There is a huge difference between the two.

I stand by all I said in my previous post, but I wanted to elaborate on a point I made there. Darren Aronovsky and his co-writer Ari Handel included many Biblical themes in the script; they didn’t just go wacko with Jewish mysticism.

Examples?

  • Methuselah’s “magic tricks” borrowed from the miracles we read of Elisha in 2 Kings.
  •       Remember when he stood before the army and called down fire?  Read these two passages.
  •       Remember when he touched Ila and she was healed of her barrenness? Read this.
  • Noah’s “acid trip” vision of the Ark was not any stranger than Abraham’s vision of a walking fire pot and torch in Genesis 15.  A lot has been made of Methuselah giving Noah a “roofie” to induce a hallucinogenic vision, but you will recall before he got to Methuselah’s mountain, he had already had the vision of the flood – without drugs.
  • The exchanges between Noah & Tubal-Cain bore out that God had given man dominion over the earth.  Noah rightly knew it meant stewardship; Tubal-Cain chose to interpret it as domination.

Ultimately, the theme of the movie was to do justly, but love mercy. (Micah 6:8)

  • All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. (Romans 3:23)
  • The wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life through Christ Jesus our Lord. (Romans 6:23)

Let me leave you with this.  I think the timing of the movie has a lot to do with what God is going to do soon.  As believers, we need to realize we’re living on borrowed time.  The house is on fire.  And God is giving a sneak preview to the world through the medium it understands: the entertainment industry.  Will the world listen to the message?  Or ignore it, as the whole world did while Noah preached God’s righteousness?  Who will you try to get into the Ark?

2 Peter 3:

3 Above all, you must understand that in the last days scoffers will come, scoffing and following their own evil desires. They will say, “Where is this ‘coming’ he promised? Ever since our ancestors died, everything goes on as it has since the beginning of creation.” But they deliberately forget that long ago by God’s word the heavens came into being and the earth was formed out of water and by water. By these waters also the world of that time was deluged and destroyed. By the same word the present heavens and earth are reserved for fire, being kept for the day of judgment and destruction of the ungodly.

But do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day. The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

10 But the day of the Lord will come like a thief. The heavens will disappear with a roar; the elements will be destroyed by fire, and the earth and everything done in it will be laid bare.

11 Since everything will be destroyed in this way, what kind of people ought you to be?

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